• Cricket Australia
  • Flock to Baggy Green
  • AWI
  • The Woolmark Company
  • Kookaburra

WHAT IS THE FLOCK TO BAGGY GREEN?

Baggy Green Cap

The Flock to Baggy Green is a unique project that combines the Australian wool industry through The Woolmark Company, Cricket Australia and Kookaburra to create special baggy green cloth made from wool donated from right across Australia.

Australian woolgrowers were invited to donate some of their wool to help create the next batch of Baggy Green caps as part of The Flock to Baggy Green project. In total, just more than 400 woolgrowers have donated wool to the project and the total volume has come to about 500 kilograms. That is enough wool to cap the next 100 years of Australian Test cricketers in donated Australian wool.

START YOUR JOURNEY

The History of Cricket &

The Wool Industry

Watch video
View larger image

Cricket clubs have long formed a vital part of the fabric of rural communities, with sheep stations many years ago having their own cricket teams and many cricketing heroes past and present having had connections to the wool industry.

Cricket is Australia’s number one participation sport, with an increasing number of Australians enjoying the various forms of the game from backyards to the mighty MCG. The Australian wool industry and cricket have a long association.

The Australian Cricket Coat of Arms, created before Australia officially existed, features a sheep, which shows the wool industry’s prominence in the Australian community when the team first formed.

View larger image

The Australian Cricket team first wore their woollen Baggy Greens when it sailed for England in 1899. Not surprisingly it was our most significant industry with 25 sheep for every man, woman and child in the colonies. It was fitting the team was captained by Joe Darling; a tough middle order batsman, and South Australian woolgrower.

THE CALL FOR

WOOL DONATIONS

Map of Australia WA VIC NSW QLD TAS SA NT ACT

Wool Donors

Cricket-loving woolgrowers from the outback to the coast, from large pastoral holdings to small family businesses have all answered the call to help grow the Baggy Green.

All have donated some of the natural fibre they grow with passion to help make our most sacred sporting icon. These are the stories of the people, the animals and the landscapes behind the next 100 years of the Baggy Green.

Provenance Stories

Provenance Stories

  • Corby family

    Corby family

    Bungie, NSW

  • Cox family

    Cox family

    Mudgee, NSW

  • Frank and Betty Atkinson

    Frank and Betty Atkinson

    Narrabri, NSW

  • Kevin and Therese Welsh

    Kevin and Therese Welsh

    Eugowra, NSW

  • LF & CL Cooney

    LF & CL Cooney

    Mudgee, NSW

  • Phill & Fiona Ivins

    Phill & Fiona Ivins

    NSW

  • Deanna Johnston

    Deanna Johnston

    NSW

  • Roger & Magaret Golden

    Roger & Magaret Golden

    NSW

  • Robert & Heather Worner

    Robert & Heather Worner

    NSW

  • Gavin & Elly Tom

    Gavin & Elly Tom

    NSW

  • W & C Walter Pty Ltd

    W & C Walter Pty Ltd

    NSW

  • John & Robyn Ive

    John & Robyn Ive

    ACT

  • Alec, Zara and Grace Ziesemer

    Alec, Zara and Grace Ziesemer

    Surat, QLD

  • Geoff and Andrea Fearby

    Geoff and Andrea Fearby

    Texas, QLD

  • Katie & Calum Dow

    Katie & Calum Dow

    “Balacoona” Coonalpyn, SA

  • Grant Burge

    Grant Burge

    Barossa Valley, SA

  • Goode family

    Goode family

    Kingston, SA

  • Ian and Rudith McWater

    Ian and Rudith McWater

    Yandiah, SA

  • The Pym Family

    The Pym Family

    Rockleigh, SA

  • Agars Family

    Agars Family

    Eyre Peninsula, SA

  •  Luke and Frances Frahn

    Luke and Frances Frahn

    Carrieton, SA

  • Nick Edwards

    Nick Edwards

    Carrieton, SA

  • The Jones family

    The Jones family

    Cressy, TAS

  • The Loane family

    The Loane family

    “Aberfoyle”, Avoca, TAS

  • Annabel and Alastair McDonell

    Annabel and Alastair McDonell

    Glengarry, VIC

  • Shaun and Maria Beasley

    Shaun and Maria Beasley

    Lindenow South, VIC

  • The Cuming family

    The Cuming family

    Kent Park, VIC

  • Stephen Field

    Stephen Field

    Victoria Valley, VIC

  • Dave Vandenberge

    Dave Vandenberge

    Esperances, WA

  • W & C Walter Pty Ltd

    W & C Walter Pty Ltd

    WA

Journey of

THE BAGGY GREEN

IN THE MEDIA

AWI

Woolgrowers called upon to flock to Baggy Green

AWI

Flock to the Baggy Green hits a ton

AWI

Australian Woolgrowers invited to Flock to the Baggy Green

AWI

Love of the Game

AWI

Woolgrowers donate the next 100 years of baggy greens

AWI

Listen: Gideon Haigh talking with Gerard Whateley on SEN Radio about the Flock to Baggy Green Project

In a unique project that combines our national game with our natural fibre, Australian woolgrowers are being invited to donate some of their wool to help create the next batch of Baggy Green caps as part of AWI’s new Flock to Baggy Green project.
w
Woolgrowers called upon to Flock to the Baggy Green

Media Stories

Geoff and Andrea at shearing time

Woolgrowers called upon to Flock to the Baggy Green

Australia's wool industry is showing its love for Australian cricket as part of Flock to Baggy Green, a joint initiative between The Woolmark Company, Kookaburra, and Cricket Australia launched today. Woolgrowers from across Australia are being invited to celebrate their connection to Australia's favourite sport by donating some of their wool to be made into the fabric for cricket's iconic Baggy Green caps, for future generations of Australian cricketers.

The Flock to Baggy Green initiative will see Woolmark collect donated wool from participating woolgrowers, which will then be taken by Kookaburra to create the baggy caps worn by Australian representative cricket teams, including the Australian women's and men's teams during Test matches. Woolgrowers can donate as little or as much raw wool as they wish, with everyone who donates wool to receive a sample of the finished fabric as a memento of their contribution to Australian cricket. Woolgrowers will also be given the opportunity to share their own cricketing stories over the course of the project.

The project highlights the process by which raw Australian wool is transformed into the Baggy Green by Kookaburra. It also showcases the strong link between cricket and the wool industry, a connection that stretches back to before the federation of Australia and continues to this day. Cricket has long been at the heart of rural and remote communities throughout Australia, with many past and present Australian cricketers having connections to the wool industry and hailing from regional areas.

Cricket Australia CEO, James Sutherland, has welcomed the Flock to Baggy Green initiative as an opportunity to celebrate the Baggy Green and the connection between Australian cricket and Australian woolgrowers.

"The Baggy Green is a proud symbol of Australian cricket, and it is wonderful to have a project that gives woolgrowers from across the country the opportunity to donate some of their wool and be able to trace it to the caps that will be worn by Australian cricketers for years to come.

"The initiative is also a reminder of the strong link between Australian cricket and rural communities, with regional areas producing some of our most talented past and present players and many more people having a personal connection to cricket, and I am looking forward to hearing the stories of participating woolgrowers over the course of this project."

Stuart McCullough, CEO of Woolmark parent company Australian Wool Innovation knows woolgrowers will support the Flock to Baggy Green project.

"What a perfect opportunity for woolgrowers right across Australia to support our national cricket teams and to be able to say they have helped cap our great cricketers. Cricket and wool have been closely linked for a long time, you can actually see a sheep on the Baggy Green if you look closely."

Kookaburra Head of Communications, Shannon Gill, said "Kookaburra is honoured to be the maker of the Baggy Green for Australian teams, as well as caps for community clubs around Australia that help give every cricket team its identity. As a proudly Australian company we welcome the opportunity to help further tell the story of what cricket means to the country, from backyard to Baggy Green."

Flock to the Baggy Green hits a ton

Media Stories

Flock to the Baggy Green hits a ton

The project that combines our national game with our natural fibre has started by scoring strongly with over 100 donations of Australian wool from generous woolgrowers from right across Australia.

Australian growers have been putting their fibre behind the game by donating wool to be made into the next batch of Baggy Green caps to be worn by Australian cricketers as part of the Flock to Baggy Green project.

Wool from across Australia is being collected and processed into woven fabric to be donated as finished cloth to Cricket Australia next summer. Every woolgrower who donates is to receive a sample of the finished woven green fabric as a keepsake to place in the woolshed, office or local cricket club.

The Flock to Baggy Green project is the initiative of Marius Cuming and Stephen Feighan from AWI who have been delighted with the strong response so far.

"The generosity is wonderful. We've had donations of wool from prize rams and lots of envelopes and bags sent to AWI, even an entire bale from one incredibly generous cricket lover in South Australia has been donated to the cause. It just shows the love people have for both cricket and the wool industry. All wool and any amount is most welcome," Mr Cuming said.

Cricket Australia CEO, James Sutherland added "the initiative is also a reminder of the strong link between Australian cricket and rural communities, with regional areas producing some of our most talented past and present players and many more people having a personal connection to cricket, and I am looking forward to hearing the stories of participating woolgrowers over the course of this project."

Australian woolgrowers invited to Flock to the Baggy Green

Media Stories

Australian woolgrowers invited to Flock to the Baggy Green

In a unique project that combines our national game with our natural fibre, Australian woolgrowers are being invited to donate some of their wool to help create the next batch of Baggy Green caps as part of AWI’s new Flock to Baggy Green project.

AWI’s marketing arm The Woolmark Company, Cricket Australia and Kookaburra are now inviting woolgrowers to show their love of cricket and pride in the national team by putting their wool on the heads of future Australian cricketers.

During this summer of cricket, the Flock to Baggy Green project welcomes woolgrowers to donate as little or as much raw wool as they wish (in a standard envelope) – see below for how to take part.

Wool from across Australia will be collected and processed into woven fabric to be donated as finished cloth to Cricket Australia in 12 months’ time. Every woolgrower who provides wool will receive a sample of the finished fabric as a keepsake.

During the course of this project, as we report on the progress of manufacture, woolgrowers will be able to see what is involved from taking wool through the supply chain. Furthermore, media coverage of the project will also increase the public’s awareness of Australian woolgrowers and their wool.

Cricket and the wool industry

Cricket clubs have long formed a vital part of the fabric of rural communities, with sheep stations many years ago having their own cricket teams and many cricketing heroes past and present having had connections to the wool industry.

Cricket is Australia’s number one participation sport, with an increasing number of Australians enjoying the various forms of the game from backyards to the mighty MCG.

The Australian wool industry and cricket have a long association. The Australian Cricket Coat of Arms, created before Australia officially existed, features a sheep, which shows the wool industry’s prominence in the Australian community when the team first formed.

In fact between 1860 and 1960, wool was Australia’s largest export earner, the industry being one of the key drivers of economic wealth for a young country finding its feet. Today, the wool industry is worth $3.5 billion and employs tens of thousands of men and women across the paddocks, sheep yards, woolsheds, processing plants, design studios and fashion houses across the country.

The Baggy Green cap is made from 100% Australian wool. It is worn by Australian Test cricketers and is seen as the highest honour a player can receive. Australian cricketers first started wearing what became known as the Baggy Green in 1899. Kookaburra took over production of the iconic caps in 2016. Now individual woolgrowers across Australia can get directly involved.

Australian Wool Innovation Chairman Ms Colette Garnsey OAM hands Cricket Australia Chairman Earl Eddings the next era of baggy green cloth
Australian Wool Innovation Chairman Ms Colette Garnsey OAM hands Cricket Australia Chairman Earl Eddings the next era of baggy green cloth

Media Stories

Woolgrowers donate the next 100 years of baggy greens

Australian Wool Innovation Chairman Ms Colette Garnsey OAM has handed Cricket Australia Chairman Earl Eddings the next era of baggy green cloth, enough to cap the next 100 years of Australian test cricketers.

Handed over on the Adelaide oval during the tea interval at the First Test of the summer, the cloth was created as part of the Flock to Baggy Green project and donated by 450 woolgrowers from across Australia and forms 1000 lineal metres of fabric with an average fibre diameter of 20 microns.

All donors to the project have been placed on a map of Australia on the dedicated website www.flocktobaggygreen.com.au where From Flock to Baggy Green by renowned cricket writer Gideon Haigh outlines the strong and lasting bonds between cricket and wool.

AWI General Manager Operations Nigel Gosse outlined the work with Cricket Australia was part of AWI’s commitment to its fibre advocacy program.

“Flock to Baggy Green has created a lasting legacy from the woolgrowers of Australia to Australian cricket, adding to the history and provenance of one of our nation’s most significant sporting icons,” Mr Gosse explained.

“Cricket-loving woolgrowers from the outback to the coast, from large pastoral holdings to small family businesses have all answered the call to help grow the Baggy Green. All have donated some of the natural fibre they grow with passion to help make our most sacred sporting icon.

“At AWI our role is to increase the long-term profitability of Australian woolgrowers and to advocate for the natural fibre domestically and overseas.

“This fabric has been grown on more than 450 properties across Australian and donated by cricket loving woolgrowers which adds to the history and provenance of one of our nation’s most significant sporting icons.

“The presentation creates a lasting legacy from the woolgrowers of Australia to Australian cricket.”

The Flock to Baggy Green project combines the Australian wool industry, Cricket Australia and Kookaburra to create special baggy green cloth made from wool donated from across Australia.

Cricket Australia Chairman Earl Eddings said the project will continue to build the meaning of the Baggy Green Cap for Australian cricketers.

All wool donors will be receiving a sample of the cloth and a copy of From Flock to Baggy Green as a keepsake.

THE JOURNEY CONTINUES...

The green cloth woolgrowers have contributed their raw wool to will be made into future Baggy Green caps for all Australian test cricketers. There is enough wool fabric to make the next 100 years worth of Baggy Greens. Knowing that the fabric has been grown on over 400 properties across the land by cricket loving woolgrowers gives provenance and meaning to our most significant sporting icon and weaves a special and lasting bond between two quintessentially Australian institutions: cricket and wool.